Recommended Daily Water Intake

creative common licence by google

 How much water should you drink each day? It’s a simple question with no easy answer.

Studies have produced varying recommendations over the years. These recommendations are based on research, personal preferences and medical conditions.

To help you plan your drinking, here is some information about recommended daily water intake for men and women of all ages.

1 in 4 adults in the U.S. has a doctor’s recommendation to consume 2.5 cups (5 1/2 ounces) to 3 8/20 cups (12 3/4 ounces) of water or 7.5 cups (22 1/8 ounces) of plain water each day. That equates to approximately 8 4-ounce glasses of water each day.

creative common licence by google

People who are very active may be able to increase their recommended daily water intake to 5 to 8 servings per day. This amount includes 8 to 10 cups of fluid from foods: 6 cups of water, tea and coffee; one full glass of milk or juice; and one small cup of soup, cereal or juice. For people who are more sedentary, those who don’t exercise regularly but still take part in vigorous activities, the average person could increase his or her recommended daily hydration from 3 to 7 servings (1 1/2 1-ounce cups), depending on the intensity of their activity.

2 in 3 people have a doctor’s recommendation to drink at least 8 cups (20 1/2 ounces) of water each day. The other 2 in 3 people have a doctor’s recommendation to drink 14 at least 12 cups (28 2/8 ounces). This equates to 22 to 24 cups (44 to 51 ounces) water. People who stay up late in an evening need more fluids than light sleepers. Those who have chronic kidney problems, or diabetes need more liquid calories because they produce less urine as a result. Those who do not eat enough protein need more fluid. Women who menstruate need another 21 cups (52 1/2 1-ounce cups) of water for ovulation. Men should use 9 cups (22 1/8 ounces) of water during a typical menstrual cycle. Adults need 9 cups (22 1/8 ounces) of water to maintain normal blood pressure levels. If any of these recommendations aren’t being followed, you need to rethink your water intake.

3 in 4 Americans do not follow these guidelines to reach recommended daily water intake of 9 to 11 cups (23 to 25 1/2 1-ounce cups) each day. They need to increase this amount by 1 cup (25 grams) per day for boys and 2 cups (5 tablespoons or 2 teaspoons) per day for girls. You can read our article about proper amounts of fluids if you are not sure what the right amount is for you. If you have problems like heartburn, constipation or diarrhea, it’s important that you keep track of your fluids so you know how much to consume each day.

4 in 10 people who are older than 60 years old do not have a doctor’s recommendation for recommended daily water intake of 13 to 15 cups (35 to 40 1/2 1-ounce cups) each day. Because most older adults are getting sicker, they need additional quantities of fluids to manage their symptoms. In fact, even though younger people need fewer fluids, it is crucial to avoid excess quantities of fluids because it makes you feel bloated and weak. One way to stay hydrated without adding more fluids is to drink warm water slowly in 30 seconds. Another way to stay hydrated and not have to worry about losing lots of fluids is to drink warm water in a cold glass. For people who do not drink fluids at all, their bodies are likely dehydrated and they need extra amounts of fluids for that reason. To increase recommended daily water intake for older adults, it’s best to drink 8 to 10 cups (22 1/8 1-ounce cups) about half an hour before bedtime because that’s when we feel the most tired. Drinking only 3 to 4 cups (8 to 10 1/8 1-ounce cups) each day is helpful for keeping your muscles strong.

creative common licence by google

5 in 10 adults who are younger than 18 years old do not have a doctor’s recommendation for recommended daily water intake of 6 to 8 cups (16 to 20 1/2 1-ounce cups) every day. Younger people need extra fluids because they can get headaches. Older people need extra fluids because they have arthritis or osteoporosis and may have issues with bladder control. Young people need extra fluids and because their bodies aren’t producing as much fluid, more fluids will keep them more hydrated. Too much of either should be avoided, especially before going to the gym or doing intense physical activity. A good rule of thumb is to never exceed 12 cups (28 1/8 cups) and a few cans of drinks a day. Young people need more fluids for sports than most adults because they are more active. Also, the right amount of fluid for young people is usually just under 7 cups (16 ounce) per day while for people over 50 years old, more fluids are needed.

6 in 10 younger adults drink slightly more fluids than older adults. People who are younger need between 8 and 10 cups (22 1/8 cups) of fluids each day because they are more active. They have more energy levels which means they are likely to perform better at work or play. However, older adults need less fluids because their bodies have limited supplies of the minerals they need to perform well. Young people need more fluids for sporting events because of the energy they provide in games. Both groups need more fluids for their immune systems than people who are older.

creative common licence by google

7 in 10 people are older and don’t have a doctor’s recommendation for recommended daily water intake of 5 to 8 cups (16 to 20 1/2 1-ounce cups) every day. Those older adults need extra fluids because they have lower metabolisms. Their bodies can only hold so much fluid at once and they will experience fatigue if they start to feel full. Those older adults need to compensate for that and their bodies keep them hydrated by helping them remove water through pee. Older adults do NOT want extra liquids because they lose muscle mass and coordination.

8 in 10 younger adults drink slightly more fluids than older adults. There are two reasons why younger adults need less fluid: firstly, they are more active and secondly, younger adults have fewer body parts that need fluids. At the same time, those older adults don’t have all the bodily functions that younger adults have. Therefore, younger adults need less fluids to compensate for the lack of fluids in older adults. Those older adults need more fluids for their immune system and digestive systems.

9 in 10 adults have a doctor’s recommendation for recommended daily water intake of 10 to 12 cups (28 to 29 1/2 1-ounce cups) per day. People who are older than 60 years old don’t need extra fluids because their bodies can hold a bit more fluid. Older adults need more fluids to compensate for their age. Those older adults need more fluids because their bodies don’t have to hold as much liquid, which leaves them feeling empty. Older adults need more fluids because they aren’t as physically active. Younger adults need more fluids to compensate for the lack of nutrients. Younger adults don’t need more. Older adults need extra fluids because they are thinner and they need extra fluids to compensate for their poor hydration. Younger adults need the right fluid volume for the right reasons.

10 in 10 people who are younger than 65 years old have a doctor’s recommendation for recommended daily water intake of 6 to 8 cups (16 to 20 1/2 1-ounce cups) every day. Children have no restrictions on water intake and do not need extra fluid because their bodies have less capacity to store water.

9 in 10 younger adults have a doctor’s recommendation for recommended daily water intake of 2 to 3 cups (5 1/2 1-ounce cups) every day. Most kids are getting enough to drink at home and most children don’t need extra to go out and do things. Some older adults need extra fluids to compensate for their own lack of fluids. Younger adults drink much less fluids than older adults because younger adults aren’t really physically active. Younger adults need more fluids than older adults because they don’t have to use them to be active. Younger adults also don’t need as much water for sports.

How do I know what my fluid needs are? You need to find out your normal hydration level. It’s important to note that this is different than someone else’s. For example, for someone who doesn’t normally exercise or take part in vigorous activity, he or she might not need adequate water to stay hydrated. An accurate measurement is necessary to determine the appropriate hydration level. When done correctly, measuring your total fluid intake and comparing to a specific level helps you figure out whether you’re actually getting enough fluids to meet your needs. Remember to include at least five cups (15 1/2 cups) of fluids every day to make sure you are getting enough fluids.

When making your fluid intake estimates, consider your age:

For individuals younger than 16 years old, you can estimate your daily average fluid intake by multiplying your weight in pounds by 8 ounces of water. For adolescents and young adults, you multiply by 12 ounces (28 litres) of water and divide

Post a Comment

0 Comments